Monthly Archives: January 2017

The Dispatcher by John Scalzi – a book review

thedispatcher  5 Stars

This book’s expected publication is May 31st, 2017.

Scalzi writes a chilling story of how people will still continue to want to dispel revenge even when killing someone or anyone dying is almost a thing of the past. Great sub-plot of what is the value of life and if dying is really a sign that God has a hand in it.

Excellent sci-fi / mystery novella. I definitely would like to see this continue in a full length novel. The characters were great and the pacing was spot-on. This would be a great series Mr. Scalzi, hint, hint. The cop, Langdon, and the Dispatcher, Valdez, make a great team.

More please.

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Categories: 2017 Publication Release, Book Review, Book Talk, Bookshelf, Dystopia, Mystery | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Princess Saves Herself in the End by Amanda Lovelace – a book review

amandalovelaceprincess – 5 Stars

Wow, my words and writing style are inadequate to convey the impact this small powerful book holds.

Powerful! Raw. Courageous. Brutally honest.

This is a book of prose. I know there are some who say this is not poetry; it’s too simplistic, just a few words, not epic. It is simple in it’s format, but that doesn’t mean the written work isn’t poetry. And simple doesn’t mean bad. It’s straightforward. It’s brave. It resonates truth. Amanda’s Lovelace’s truth.

This is one I will revisit often.

Categories: Book Review, Book Talk, Bookshelf, Nonfiction, Poetry, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

trevornoahbac  – 5 star Read 

Insightful, tragic, funny and uplifting!

I listened to the audio version as I read along with my copy of the hardcover version; I have never “double” experienced a book in this way before, and while slower than what I would normally read at, it was a complete immersive experience in a story of high quality.

This is the story of Trevor Noah growing up in South Africa as a product of a black mother and a white father, in a time when it was illegal to have a child born of these two mixed races. This is not the story of how he rose to stardom, got the job as host of the Daily Show, or even of how he started out working as a comedian. Other than a line or two in passing, there is no mention of his career. This is the story of a boy growing up in Apartheid South Africa and the life and minor social readjustments when Apartheid ended.

Trevor Noah knows how to tell a story, but more importantly he sifted through his history and found his voice to tell the best possible story of his life. He does not glamorize or hide his scars or his sins or the way the world is. He offers meaningful insight into Apartheid in South Africa, class divisions, race divisions and social divisions. He tells it like he experienced it.

He takes on the issues of domestic violence, of trying to find his way in a world that he was always an outsider in, and of his Mother’s fierce love and determination that injustice and wrong can be overcome if you don’t pay homage to the rules that divide us. He addresses crime and criminality and what it’s like to grow up within a South African Hood environment. He talks about the things that keep you trapped and how movement out, into something better, is frayed with pressures to keep people locked in. This book has an eerily chilling truth vibe to it that isn’t just aimed at pointing out the flaws of one country but ring true throughout the rest of the world, whenever we try to separate others from ourselves or put people into boxes / places that we ourselves haven’t lived in.

Trevor Noah speaks 5 different languages and listening to the Audio of this book helped with the passages written in different languages. He also does voice characterizations very well.

This is a powerful story told by a funny guy who lays his truth on the line. One of the best autobiographies I have ever read.

Categories: audiobooks, Biography, Book Review, Book Talk, Bookshelf, Nonfiction | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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